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Earth Science

Earth Science Tue Feb 20 2018 16:00:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)
WHERE THE PARTY'S AT -- So, there this piece recently published at Undark called "The Magnetic Field Is Shifting. The Poles May Flip. This Could Get Bad.". Unsurprisingly, I have thoughts. Somewhat complicated thoughts. Let’s start with the importa
Ensuring openness and reproducibility in ecology is an ongoing challenge, although open tools (e.g.,R Studio, Github) are free to use, and user support is everywhere. To illustrate how ecology collaborations can fit within an open science framework,
Many rocks are covered with circular hollows that look like honeycomb, and now we may finally understand how these strange formations come into existence
The fact we are running out of something so seemingly limitless as sand is a potent symbol of humanity's destructiveness. We must all strive to do better
For a couple of years now, I've been telling a story at the beginning of the introductory geology course I teach, called How the Earth Works. I like to think it gives a flavour of the kinds of stories you can tell about the Earth, if you know how to
Male Hawaiian crickets that have lost the ability to chirp still go through the motion of singing, even though females cant hear them
The premise of earthquake early warning systems is simple. An earthquake produces several different kinds of seismic waves that race away from the rupture point. Because they are different kinds of vibrations, they travel at different speeds; and the
Male Hawaiian crickets that have lost the ability to chirp still go through the motion of singing, even though females cant hear them
Preface For the 3rd year in a row, I have meticulously tracked each and every paper, proposal, manuscript, etc. I read for professional reasons. Begun by Jacquelyn Gill in early 2015, I found the twitter hashtag #365papers an appealing way &#8230
Gone West is offering travellers and businesses a simple way to reduce their carbon footprints
Why 2017 was a quiet year - and an examination of the provocative hypothesis that 2018 may not be. Continue reading →Plenty of natural disasters hit the news in 2017, but most of the headlines were hogged by disasters linked to extreme weat
In Western cities, household products like deodorants and paints are a bigger source of air pollution than vehicle exhausts so heres what we need to do
Not much may have made it onto the blog, but its been a busy year for both Anne and Chris in 2017. Heres a brief summary of what weve been up to - with pretty pictures where appropriate. Continue reading →Not much may have made it onto the
The population of Bornean orangutans fell by almost half in just 16 years, and it was not a sad by-product of deforestation: many apes were killed deliberately
If you’ve walked through the forest on a rainy day and noticed that it’s drier under the trees, you’ve experienced interception. In hydrology, interception is when water gets hung up on vegetative leaves, needles, or bra
If you're a greedy bat, it helps to have a hairy tongue. The hairs will ensure that you can slurp as much nectar as possible from flowers into your mouth
It’s Earth Science Week and Congress is still debating the budget for this fiscal year. That means that science funding is still on the line. The American Geophysical Union is running a campaign encouraging members to speak up for NASA&
In July 2017 a huge iceberg broke away from Antarcticas Larsen C ice shelf, revealing a marine world that was concealed for thousands of years
There’s been a lot of speculation and discussion about the role of urbanization in contributing to the flooding from Hurricane Harvey in Houston. Fortunately, urban hydrology is my specialty, so even though I’ve never been to Hous
Meteorologists cannot currently predict the monster storms that occasionally strike Australia, but decades of newspaper accounts suggest there may be a pattern
This Friday at noon, the Kent State University Department of Geology is hosting a panel discussion on the human role in the catastrophic flooding experienced by Houston and surrounding communities in the wake of Hurricane Harvey. I will be one &#
From electronics to concrete, modern life depends on sand. With supplies running low and mines harming the environment, its time to use it smarter
August 30th: Harvey reminds us that we should treat climate change as we treat other public health threats. That’s the argument in this New York Times op-ed: Harvey, the storm that humans helped cause. August 29th: The most sobering hot-tak
Rapid global warming is said to be ringing the death knell for polar bears, by melting their icy hunting grounds. But the reality is more complex
Here are two more weeks of daily climate change impacts stories, as part of my #365climateimpacts project. I didn’t have to go very far from home to find inspiration for this fornight of tweets. We had an incredibly unusual heat …
A dog that was buried with its owners 14,000 years ago was chronically ill throughout its life, yet its owners repeatedly nursed it back to health suggesting a deep bond of friendship
In January, I launched the #365climateimpacts project, in which I’ll spend a year tweeting stories of the many ways climate change is impacting people, ecosystems, and the earth; ideas for how to communicate about climate change more effect
Pacific white skate lay their eggs onto the sizzling hot rocks of hydrothermal vents in the depths of the sea, possibly because the heat speeds up their development
California is having a very wet winter, with multiple atmospheric rivers dumping feet of precipitation in the mountains. Oroville Dam on the Feather River, is the nation's tallest dam, is facing serious engineering challenges. This Storify has some o
There seems to have been a surge in ultraviolet radiation during the Permian extinction 252 million years ago, and it might have left plants infertile rather than kill them
Our changing climate is already affecting lives in a multitude of ways, and the impacts of climate change will only increase as the world continues to heat up. But because climate operates in the background, it’s easy to ignore the &#82
Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, has talked up his mission to scale back its powers. It's so shortsighted, saysIan Graber-Stiehl
We are six days into the Trump administration in the United States of America and we are seeing clear signs that the Trump intends to keep his campaign promises to roll back environmental protection and federal scientific efforts (among a …
Bombardier beetles sometimes get eaten by toads, but they can squirt hot, toxic jets of liquid from their backsides so the toads often vomit them right back up
Last semester, when teaching my intro class about the composition and structure of the Earth and how we know, I went a bit overboard in producing a snazzy Earth cross-section: I’m still pretty proud of this, but one of its … Conti
The archaeological record suggests few large animals lived in Arabia in the last few thousand years, but prehistoric rock art from the area depicts a host of big beasts
1. Introduction As a scientist, one of my big challenges is to keep on top of the vast and ever-growing body of scientific knowledge about my research and teaching subjects. I’m not the only one who apparently struggles with this &#8230
Wooden tools are hardly ever preserved, but a cache found in Italy suggests Neanderthals made them with fire and used them to dig up foods like tubers