Sociology

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Sociology

Sociology Sat Apr 21 2018 10:00:00 GMT+0000 (UTC)
WHERE THE PARTY'S AT -- Regarding this paper, Frank Harrell writes: One grammatical correction: Alvan Feinstein, the ‘father of clinical epidemiology’ at Yale, educated me about ‘trichotomy’. dichotomous = Greek dicho (two) + tomous (
When it comes go girls' names, the letter A reigns over the whole alphabet. It's the #1 first (and last) letter for American girls, by a mile. After A comes a powerhouse trio: E as in Emma, M as in Mia, S as in Sophia. Together, the four initials acc
We make up our minds one thought at a time, according to a new book. But challenging the entrenched idea that our thoughts run deep will take strong, new arguments
We (Sean Talts, Michael Betancourt, Me, Aki, and Andrew) just uploaded a paper(code available here) that outlines a framework for verifying that an algorithm for computing a posterior distribution has been implemented correctly. It is easy to use, st
The top baby name of the 1970s was Michael, but meeting a man named Mike doesn't immediately conjure up the "Me Decade." Michael was too diffuse of a hit, encompassing half a century in its popularity wave. For a pure, potent dose of the '70s, you ne
The US army has built a system that can quickly create virtual locations for soldiers to train in. It took only three days to make North and South Korea
In an article to appear in the journal Child Development, “Distinguishing polemic from commentary in science,” physicist David Grimes and psychologist Dorothy Bishop write: Exposure to nonionizing radiation used in wireless commun
Here at BabyNameWizard.com, we leave no stone unturned in our investigation of names and culture. In that spirit, we present a new first: a tale of baby names and body hair. The name in today's spotlight is the playfully regal confection Milady. Some
The clouds on WASP-104b an exoplanet orbiting a star 466 light years away have been swept away by radiation, leaving a surface that reflects almost no light
Dan Kahan tells this story: Too much here to digest probably, but the common theme is—what if people start saying their work “replicates” or “fails to replicate” when the studies in question are massi
Hollywood wouldn’t be what it is today without the pioneering glamour of its early starlets—and neither would the U.S. top 100 names list. Turn-of-the-century names like Clara (as in actress Clara Bow), Lillian (Gish), and Alice (
People who migrate are at heightened risk of anxiety disorders, and these mental health problems may linger and get more severe through subsequent generations
Yesterday we discussed a sad but all-too-familiar story of a little research project that got published and hyped beyond recognition. The published paper was called, “The more you play, the more aggressive you become: A long-term experiment
Seven names with a "bel" ending, from Annabelle to Mabel, rank among the top thousand names for American girls. Does that exhaust all the possibilities? Not by a long shot. A host of "bels"—and other popular name endings—are waiti
Paula Williams transitioned from male to female six years ago. She talks about learning about her white male privilege the hard way
Someone pointed me to this article, “The more you play, the more aggressive you become: A long-term experimental study of cumulative violent video game effects on hostile expectations and aggressive behavior,” by Youssef Hasan, La
In May, the U.S. government will release its annual baby name statistics and I will post the new top 20 name list in this space. It's the most exciting naming day of the year, my profession's Superbowl Sunday. But how much does that top 20 list reall
Trees repeatedly move their branches up and down during the night, and this may reflect water being pumped along the branches just like a human pulse
Usually for April 1st I schedule a joke post, something like: Why I don’t like Bayesian statistics, or Enough with the replication police, or Why tables are really much better than graphs, or Move along, nothing to see here, or A randomized
When you first watched Game of Thrones, did you notice the name Arya? Has it struck you that you know young boys named Emmett, Wyatt and Everett? Would you be surprised to meet a new baby named Karen? Or, perhaps, do you just think about every baby n
Societies can be taught to be less misogynistic, but the first step is understanding how gender norms have backfired on men as well as women
The following showed up in my email one day: From: Subject: Self-Plagarism in Current Opinion in Psychology Date: March 9, 2018 at 4:06:25 PM EST To: “gelman@stat.columbia.edu” Hello, You might be interested in the tremendous amou
We have Disney movies to thank for popularizing elegant princess names like Ariel and Jasmine over the years. But what about the unexpected character names that remain outside the spotlight? Plenty of our favorite animated characters have fabulous na
Autonomous cars are preparing to drive from Oxford to London. The thorny route includes motorways, pedestrian packed streets and an occasional pheasant
In an article entitled Laplace’s Theories of Cognitive Illusions, Heuristics, and Biases, Josh “hot hand” Miller and I write: In his book from the early 1800s, Essai Philosophique sur les Probabilits, the mathematician P
What makes an old-time name come back? Why is Hazel a darling of 21st Century parents, while Ethel remains in hibernation? The answer lies deep in the mysterious heart of contemporary style. Today, we’re digging to try to find that answer&a
Several types of dangerous bacteria, carrying genes that our antibiotics cannot fight, are travelling the world hidden in ships' ballast tanks
Dale Lehman writes: You have often critiqued those headline grabbing studies such as how news about shark attacks influence voting behavior, how the time of month/color of clothing influences voting, etc. I am in total agreement with your criticisms
The superhero movie Black Panther is a blockbuster, and a phenomenon. Beyond its critical and box office success, it has rapidly become a watershed film for a generation of African-American fans. The portrayal of a majestic, super-powered African soc
30 per cent of women experience sexual violence in their lifetimes bad parenting, low respect and the glorification of male competition are to blame
A couple people pointed me to this article, “The Moral Hazard of Lifesaving Innovations: Naloxone Access, Opioid Abuse, and Crime,” by Jennifer Doleac and Anita Mukherjee, which begins: The United States is experiencing an epidemi
The most popular names in Germany today are far from the old standards like Franz and Helga. Romantic Italian options, quirky nicknames, and vintage gems can be found in the top 100 names for both genders. Sehr toll! German parents have embr
Nurse, get some milk, stat! Plus: zombie racoons in Ohio, the science of crying on airplanes, why penguins go with the floe, and more
Aaron Gullickson writes: I thought you might be interested in this comment (of which I am the author) and response (by Elizabeth McClintock) that just came out in ASR. The subject is about whether beauty and status (e.g. education, income) are exchan
Titan. Cairo. Royalty. Exotic word names like these are a hallmark of our naming era. With parents constantly on the lookout for fresh ideas, attractive titles, concepts, place names and more turn into popular names overnight. Yet as ultra-modern as
The Universal Cancer Databank will let anyone with cancer share their medical and genetic data with researchers globally, with the aim of speeding up new treatments
The paper’s called Voting patterns in 2016: Exploration using multilevel regression and poststratification (MRP) on pre-election polls, it’s by Rob Trangucci, Imad Ali, Doug Rivers, and myself, and here’s the abstract: W
After months of debate, Trump's pick to head NASA has now been confirmed. This ends the space agency's longest-ever period without permanent leadership
Shira Mitchell wrote: I gave a talk today at Mathematica about NHST in low power settings (Type M/S errors). It was fun and the discussion was great. One thing that came up is bias from doing some kind of regularization/shrinkage/partial-pooling vers
Most solar cells are limited by how much energy their electrons can absorb. Denting their materials could help them harvest more electricity and breeze past that limit
David Palmer writes: If you need yet another study to look at, check this out: “Reduction in Firearm Injuries during NRA Annual Conventions.” The post No, I don’t believe that “Reduction in Firearm Injuries dur
Diamonds may be tough, but they can also be surprisingly flexible. A team of researchers grew diamond nanoneedles that bent and then sprang back upright
In trying to make sense of the 2016 election and its polling, people keep bringing up the idea of the “shy Trump voters”—those people who supported Trump for president but didn’t want to admit this to pollsters
Most plants were expected to grow more as CO2 levels rise, but a 20-year experiment suggests that the extra CO2 is somehow stunting plant growth, which could make climate change worse
Apparently there’s an idea out there that Bayesian inference with Gaussian processes automatically avoids overfitting. But no, you can still overfit. To be precise, Bayesian inference by design avoids overfitting—if the evaluation
A smart glasses app may help children with autism to focus on and interact with other people by overlaying bullseye targets and cartoon faces
Jay Livingston points to this hypey article, “Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?”, by Jean Twenge, who writes: Ive been researching generational differences for 25 years . . . Typically, the characteristics that come to defi
Male insects have been genetically engineered to climax on command, and it seems they get a real buzz out of it perhaps even a fly orgasm
Paul Alper points us to these graphs: Pretty stunning. I mean, really stunning. Why are we just hearing about this now, given that the pattern is a decade old? And what’s this: “Data for the U.S. ends in 2007”? Huh? Also
Some of the last great wildernesses are being considered as likely candidates for geoengineering. It's a sad reflection of climate failings, says Olive Heffernan